libutron:

zooophagous:

libutron:

Glowing mushrooms - Mycena lux-coeli 
Like fireflies, luminescent squid, and other so-called bioluminescent organisms, glow-in-the-dark mushrooms contain an enzyme known as luciferin. When luciferin is oxidized (i.e. comes in contact with oxygen), it emits energy in the form of light, which causes organisms containing it to glow.
Numerous species of Mycena form luminescent mycelium and/or fruiting bodies. No fewer than 26 species of Mycena have been reported as bioluminescent. This one in the picture is Mycena lux-coeli, native to Japan where it is found almost solely on large shi-no-ki trees (Castanopsis sieboldii, or chinkapins in English), one of the dominant climax species in the native forests of the Kii Peninsula in Japan.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Masahisa Uemura | Locality: Nachikatsuura, Higashimuro District, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan (2013)

Does a glow in the dark mushroom leave a glow in the dark spore print?

Well, first of all, one of the distinctive features of the fungi in the Mycena genus is that they are characterized by a white spore print. Secondly, of the several species of Mycena reported as bioluminescent in the literature, some have luminescent mycelium and also the fruiting bodies, some only the mycelium, other only the fruiting bodies, and a few (2) only the spores.
As far as I’ve read, Mycena lux-coeli is one of those species in which only the fruiting body glows, so I suppose that its spore print, white, does not glow in the dark.
Here you can find a paper that lists all species of glowing Mycena. 

libutron:

zooophagous:

libutron:

Glowing mushrooms - Mycena lux-coeli 

Like fireflies, luminescent squid, and other so-called bioluminescent organisms, glow-in-the-dark mushrooms contain an enzyme known as luciferin. When luciferin is oxidized (i.e. comes in contact with oxygen), it emits energy in the form of light, which causes organisms containing it to glow.

Numerous species of Mycena form luminescent mycelium and/or fruiting bodies. No fewer than 26 species of Mycena have been reported as bioluminescent. This one in the picture is Mycena lux-coeli, native to Japan where it is found almost solely on large shi-no-ki trees (Castanopsis sieboldii, or chinkapins in English), one of the dominant climax species in the native forests of the Kii Peninsula in Japan.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Masahisa Uemura | Locality: Nachikatsuura, Higashimuro District, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan (2013)

Does a glow in the dark mushroom leave a glow in the dark spore print?

Well, first of all, one of the distinctive features of the fungi in the Mycena genus is that they are characterized by a white spore print. Secondly, of the several species of Mycena reported as bioluminescent in the literature, some have luminescent mycelium and also the fruiting bodies, some only the mycelium, other only the fruiting bodies, and a few (2) only the spores.

As far as I’ve read, Mycena lux-coeli is one of those species in which only the fruiting body glows, so I suppose that its spore print, white, does not glow in the dark.

Here you can find a paper that lists all species of glowing Mycena

(via anomalousvie)